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 Post subject: WW1 J Wallington 33866
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 5:32 pm 
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Location: Brackley. UK
I purchased this kukri from Josh as part of a trio, The other 2 have been posted already. I was hoping to have had more info about this one but I am waiting to hear from the dealer so this is what I have so far.

The blade is a partial tang construction and is hollow forged. It has two hand cut grooves along the back edge. It is a light kukri with a rounded slender tapered spine.
It has a keen edge and a very clean kukri. The Kaudi has a drop back to it and a round peg. The bolster seems to be a bright white metal. It looks like it could be Nickel silver (there are no hallmarks) to me. There are no rub marks and the metal seems a bit soft.

The handle is a quality affair as well. It looks like horn but not like the Buffalo horn I have seen on later BSI’s or the horn on my 1920’s Officer Dia Chira. The handle is very cleanly carved with a delicate mid ring and two pairs of grooves on the fore handle. The end of the handle is flat and has no marks either.
The scabbard looks original; it is tooled leather over wood as is traditional. There are no pouches on the back they look to have been lost at some point. There would have been a strap around it too. The leather is decorated with lining around the edges; there is no chape and no sign that there was one. Unfortunately it is split down the belly.

This Kukri came from the estate of a WW1 officer it was sold to a dealer along with his medals. I contacted the dealer who sold Josh this kukri and he is looking through his ledgers to find out who owned it. I am very hopeful that he will have the name of the officer so I can do some research into his service. If the medals were sold at the same time his name will have been stamped into the edge of them and recorded as it is thought there were not just the standard WW1 trio.


Specs;
Overall 425mm
Blade 325mm
Handle 100mm
Arc 350mm
Belly 60mm
Drop 85mm
Spine @ricasso 7.5mm
Spine @belly 6mm
Weight 480g

Image

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I would like to hear the thoughts of my fellow forumites and I am looking forward to hopefully getting the name of the original owner and trying to research his history, service and learning more about the man. I will of course keep everyone up date as to my progress.

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Last edited by Captain on Mon Feb 17, 2014 5:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2014 7:53 pm 
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A great knife and would be wonderful to research if possible. Shame that it parted company with the other collectibles but that stuff happens all the time as dealers in militaria do it to cover all the bases and not miss a sale.

Robert


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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 4:08 pm 
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Nice little chopper Captain! Good luck with the search! It looks well made.

Spiral


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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 12:56 am 
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It is very crisp, the handle is very well carved or turned. Does it look like normal horn to you Mr S? and I have not encountered a partial tanged horn handle before, the end grain is very tight.
I like the round Kaudi peg too not seen that detail before.
I am always hopeful but if I can find a name and No it will be a good starting point for hopefully a very interesting journey. It is a shame that bits get split up, Medals one way, Kukri another with papers and uniform going by way of the last two points on the compass. I have been very lucky to have bought a kukri from a grandson of an officer and he very kindly let me copy service papers and I even got a copy of an old photo of the gent in his pith helmet. I am not so sure I will get this lucky again but there is tell that the owner of this one had more than Pip and Squeak to pin on his chest.

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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 10:49 am 
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I think so Dave, much of the water buffalo horn pre. ww2 seems a very different beast from the standard we usually see today, often more green,brown or coloured & more fibrous , compared with the mostly black/grey we see today.

But that said to be certain, I need good clear end grain photos of the butt end to rule out other possibilities.

spiral


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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 3:32 pm 
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Cheers Spiral. Here is what I hope is a clear end on shot.
These early horn handles are very different to the new Mk's handles I agree, this one is a different grain as it were to the 1920's officers DC.
I shall look forward to your views.

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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 6:47 pm 
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To me Captain that looks like very high quality water buffalo horn.

The central lineal dotty line is an identifying feature for top third of large good quality water buffalo horn. {the lower section being more hollow.}

Heres a thread you might find interesting.

spiral

http://www.ikrhs.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=261&p=3239#p3239


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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 2:10 am 
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Thanks for the link that was interesting, I never knew Buffalo horn comes in so many varieties and colours.
I knew cow horn was very different, I made a handle for a little carver once with French Cow horn that had some great colours in it. It is a wonderful medium to work in and takes a great polish.

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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 7:43 pm 
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Sounds interesting David! Any photos? Cow horn is lovely just not much solid in it usualy, Did it need a cap or was enough solid? rams horn is beautiful as well.

Spiral


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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 7:57 pm 
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Spiral wrote:
Sounds interesting David! Any photos? Cow horn is lovely just not much solid in it usualy, Did it need a cap or was enough solid? rams horn is beautiful as well.

Spiral


It was solid enough as it is a little knife but used a brass end cap anyway as it finishes it of very well.
I love the colours in this and I'm happy to show a couple of pictures. 8)

Image

Image

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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 9:43 pm 
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Lovely work & a beautiful horn Captain! Charolais?

Silly me I was thinking "carver" as in sunday roast... rather than woodcraft! I guess then you would have said carver & fork! :lol:

Nice blade! Scandinavian?

spiral


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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 10:39 pm 
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Thank you Mr S I'm very pleased with it. I had done 2 Scian Dhubs before one in antler tine and the other with buffalo horn and bone. So I was up for trying something different.
It is French blonde cow horn if that makes sense?
The blade was made here in the UK by a fellow forumite on British Blades. Lovely little Scandi style laminated blade.
I don't think there is enough solid material to make a kukri handle on the average cow horn though which is a shame. That would be excellent if there were.

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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 12:00 am 
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Cool, Looks like He did the Scandi blade well!

I think the French white/ blonde & brown horn is usually from Charolais cattle? but I guess sometimes others may also produce that colouring.

I think occasionally ram horn could have enough substance for a small but gorgeous kukri hilt... but very few & far between, & getting rarer with modern farming styles.

I picked up a beautiful & enormous tri colour French bull hide in province about 15 years ago, in a village sale for a pittance {one day a year, in that village where everyone puts there stuff, mostly furniture, they don't, want outside there houses with a price on, or free to take away or to swap with anything they want, the next day anything still left the local council take away & dispose of it.... they certainly have got some fancy cattle out there! A leather importer , who was a guest of the same people I was, told me it was probably From the low Alps, Swiss or French based on the colouring, lack of insect bites, size & leather thickness & quality. {She could talk about hides for hours... bit like me about kukri I suppose! :lol: }

Saying that I love a steak or roast of a Devon ruby red! Or Scottish Angus even! Nice to see them in the fields as well. If I were a rich man Id have a few living in the woods! :shock: 8) :lol:

Spiral


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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 12:11 am 
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Great stuff, I think they do the whole leave the stuff outside and help yourself quite a bit on the continent I know friends who furnished their flat that way, when something better is spotted out with the old and grab the new.
The smith did a great job on the blade and a nice chap to boot. I scuffed the blade whilst finishing this project but he took it back and refinished the edge for me. It is a great blade with some really nice characteristics. 8) 8)

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 Post subject: Re: WW1 era
PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 12:44 am 
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Excellent!

spiral


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