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 Post subject: Nepalese Brunswick
PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2011 7:07 am 
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2011 8:31 pm
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At last springs Mid Atlantic Victorian Rifleman shoot and IMA tour I picked up this Nepalese percussion muzzle loading rifle with a Brunswick style barrel.

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Here are the markings in the gun. I hope the translation might offer a clue as to what this rifle really is.

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Here is the rifling.

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 Post subject: Re: Nepalese Brunswick
PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2011 8:57 pm 
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Location: Austin, Texas USA
That looks like what IMA is calling the Brunswick P-1837 Full Length Percussion Two Groove Rifle in .75 cal, but with a different hammer and no escutcheons. (Unlike your .670 version, neither of the two that Norm Sutton rebuilt for them have escutcheons). The Brunswick P-1837 type Percussion Two Groove Rifle & Bayonet: Untouched has your escutcheons, and the parts guns they are still selling appear to have the same hammer as yours. The Nepalese Brunswicks described by John Walter on page 32 of Guns of the Gurkhas have different escutcheons, with finials held by screws rather than nails like the missing ones on the IMA parts gun.
Have to admit that my skills (sic) :oops: aren't up to the task of making or rebuilding the fancy patch box, so I copped out by getting one of the late model smooth bore "Brunswick" muskets, (which also lacks the distinctive trigger guard), and has yet another type of escutcheons, rectangular rather than oval, but held by nails.
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My sense is that there was a great deal of experimentation involved in the making of these early Nepalese pieces.
Some of the numbers/letters on yours are pretty hard to decipher - maybe our Nepali expert Beoram can help out. The numbers on the rear of the bayonet lug are the serial number IIRC. How about a pic of your bayonet?

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"It is foolishness and endless trouble to cast a stone at every dog that barks at you."  George Silver, Brief Instructions to my Paradoxes of Defence, London-1599.


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 Post subject: Re: Nepalese Brunswick
PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2011 3:54 am 
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The gun best fits Walters description of Nepalese made Muskets on page 41 described under New production. There are exceptions to Walters description.

The bore is .679. The rifle has a hooked breech. Escutcheons are oval. The tail of the lock plate is notched and hooks a T-nail at the wrist. And the barrel is grooved like a Brunswick. The rifle resembles the "Serjeants of Infantry"(sic) gun in Plate 66 of Walters book.

We shot this rifle at the Alberta shoot.

I am going to have Jeff Tanner make me a mould for it.

I sure would like to hear any interpretation of the markings.


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 Post subject: Re: Nepalese Brunswick
PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2011 6:22 pm 
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Beautiful rifle. Berk alerted me, and I'll offer my "translations". Except they're not really "translations", but transliterations, i.e. turning the Devanagari script into roman letters/numbers. The reason for this is that these are all abbreviations or numbers. Berk or Spiral hopefully should be able to offer additional insights based on the transliterations.

Here are the markings in the gun. I hope the translation might offer a clue as to what this rifle really is.

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Numerals: "323"

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4 lines:
1st: "vra. je." (or "pra. je.", but the first looks more likely)
2nd: "1"
3rd: "se"
4th: "8" (or, less likely, "5")

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"paa. va." (the second character is oddly small, and hooked, but looks like "va", unless it's a weird form of a numeral)

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"3"

What these *mean* is a different question. But I believe that the first set of abbreviations should be a regiment/paltoon/division etc.


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 Post subject: Re: Nepalese Brunswick
PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2011 7:16 pm 
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beoram wrote:
Beautiful rifle. Berk alerted me, and I'll offer my "translations". Except they're not really "translations", but transliterations, i.e. turning the Devanagari script into roman letters/numbers. The reason for this is that these are all abbreviations or numbers. Berk or Spiral hopefully should be able to offer additional insights based on the transliterations.

Here are the markings in the gun. I hope the translation might offer a clue as to what this rifle really is.

Image

Numerals: "323"


This one I had figured out

Quote:
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4 lines:
1st: "vra. je." (or "pra. je.", but the first looks more likely)
2nd: "1"
3rd: "se"
4th: "8" (or, less likely, "5")


I think this set of marks may be the "rosetta stone".

Thank you!!!

Now if we can figure out what they mean.


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 Post subject: Re: Nepalese Brunswick
PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2011 3:36 am 
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Joined: Sun May 15, 2011 8:31 pm
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I went through the list in Walters book and was unable to match anything up, can anyone help?


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